Home > Reading Room > Illegal streaming starting to undo copyright protection progress

Illegal streaming starting to undo copyright protection progress

Written by Ellis Sweetenham on 10 July 2017

« Return to Reading Room

The UK Intellectual Property Office have released information which highlights the effect of illegal streaming on the strength of copyright protection.

Providers of legitimate streaming services have made steps to ensure that through their services copyright works are protected.

Streaming services such as Netflix and Spotify have introduced new streaming models which have allowed them to keep infringement in check.

However, new threats have emerged which could affect existing copyright works as well as the innovating of new works.

The Online Copyright Infringement Tracker, established by the UK IPO, has highlighted that 15% of UK internet users, which amounts to approximately 7 million people, still either stream or download material that infringes copyright.

A recent contributor to this has been illegally adapted set top boxes which allows users to bypass the legitimate channels and access major content without permission from the copyright owners. This content includes popular films and TV programmes.

However, music is also at risk. Stream-ripping, by which internet users remove and store content away from its original advertising-revenue generating platform, is becoming a significant problem.

In order to tackle this, the UK IPO have asked the Government for their response on how the issue can be resolved.

Talking on the issue, Ros Lynch, Copyright and IP enforcement director at the UK IPO has said

“Content creators deserve to be paid for their work – it is not a grey area. This government takes IP infringement extremely seriously and we are working with our industry partners and law enforcement to tackle this emerging threat.”

The Government response to the UK IPO’s request is due to be released later on this summer so watch this space!

If you'd like to know more about this article please send an email to Ellis Sweetenham quoting the article title and any questions you might have, alternatively call the office number on 02380 235 979 or send an enquiry through our contact form.

Want to speak
to someone?

Complete the form below and we’ll call you back free of charge.

Visual Captcha