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The Bank of Scotland loses information of customers again

Written by Sebina Auckburally on 12 June 2007

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The Bank of Scotland loses information of customers again. 

In the past companies such as banks have struggled with encrypting personal information, or have failed to protect personal information being released to stop others so as to stop the information from being use in a fraudulent way.

The Bank of Scotland in particular is having problems in keeping customers information confidential and safe. In January the bank had posted 75,000 of their customer’s details to woman in Aberdeen accidentally. In March the bank was reported to have lost customer data, and was named as one of the ten banks discarding individual statements in public pavement bins.

The Bank of Scotland has yet again apologised to over 62,000 banking customers as they may be victims of identity theft where it is unsure whether a disc containing customer information has been lost of stolen. The incident involves an unencrypted disc which was posted under normal circumstances. The bank admitted that the disc should have been encrypted and sent under a secure courier and blamed ‘human error’ as the problem. The bank is of the belief that the disc has been lost and as a consequence has changed procedures. The banks spokeswomen said that this incident is not connected to any of the above failures of the bank to protect customer’s information. However the bank has yet to show that they are capable of protecting customer’s personal data.

Despite the bank rejecting the idea that there is any link between the latest breach in guarding personal customer data and the other breaches, it is clear that the Bank of Scotland has to deal with serious flaws in their system of dealing with customer information.

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