Home > Reading Room > The Premier League High Court success against illegal streaming

The Premier League High Court success against illegal streaming

Written by Ellis Sweetenham on 27 July 2017

« Return to Reading Room

The Premier League has been awarded a High Court order to allow them to prevent the illegal streaming of their football games.

A key issue in relation to online content in recent years has been the rise in illegal streaming and the increasing levels of people accessing content through illegitimate channels.

This has a detrimental impact on a number of industries as much content now becomes digital.

The order received by The Premier League allows them to ensure that UK Internet Service Providers prevent people illegally accessing streams of their matches using their internet service.

This order will cover the last two months of the 2016-2017 football season as well as the 2017-2018 season in its entirety.

This order is yet another step towards the eradication of Kodi Boxes which have been adapted to allow access to content which would normally require permission or payment for access.

The Premier League have been a driving force recently in a copyright protection programme, with their efforts contributing to the shutdown of many apps and add-ons which facilitate illegal access to online content.

Speaking of their success, Kevin Plumb Director of Legal Services at The Premier League said,

"This blocking order is a game-changer in our efforts to tackle the supply and use of illicit streams of our content.  It will allow us to quickly and effectively block and disrupt the illegal broadcast of Premier League football via any means, including so called 'pre-loaded Kodi boxes'. The protection of our copyright, and the investment made by our broadcast partners, is hugely important to the Premier League and the future health of English football."

Yet another success for legitimate sources of online content, and another block in the way of illegal streaming.

If you'd like to know more about this article please send an email to Ellis Sweetenham quoting the article title and any questions you might have, alternatively call the office number on 02380 235 979 or send an enquiry through our contact form.

Want to speak
to someone?

Complete the form below and we’ll call you back free of charge.

Visual Captcha