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Tupac’s brand stolen by the Jenners?

Written by Kiran Landa, a student at Barton Peverill College on 20 August 2018

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Kendall and Kylie Jenner are renowned for their fashion, cosmetics and beauty in which has led to them successfully creating their own clothing lines. As young investors they have failed to acknowledge the standard of permission needed to use another trademark, design or icon for their own advantage.

The definition of copyright in its purest form is the legislation which protects the use of your original work or idea from being used without given consent.

Notorious BIG, KISS, Ozzy Osbourne and Tupac Shakur were all established artists who the Jenners used for their musically themed T-shirts. To their dismay the artists were oblivious to the Jenners using their names on the t-shirts in which led to the abolishment of the copyrighted t-shirts from their website.

It is understandable that the Jenners weren’t aware of the mistake they had made but out of respect they should have had the audacity to ask Tupac’s managers in using his images. Mike Miller, Tupac’s photographer, was less contempt with the situation than the other artists as he regarded that the lack of consultation led to the exploiting of Tupac’s images.

To the Jenners defense, their representative argued that the t-shirts were obtained from a company in which they were licensed to sell them, in addition to this the reprints has no (new) reproduction of Miller’s photo. Ultimately the Jenners came to an argument that there was no reason in asking for permission as they were already licensed to sell the t-shirts.

A decision was made in which the t-shirts were removed from the sale of purchasing and both parties came to a settlement.

Miller was confident that his work was protected by copyright but by having a license the Jenners were able to sell the work in which Miler saw as unfathomable. Overall the decision was equal and to their misfortune they had to independently bear their own legal fees.
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