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Mega data breach hits MySpace and Tumblr

Written by Ellis Sweetenham on 01 June 2016

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Following a large number of data breaches affecting businesses in recent years, the latest involves yet another social media site.

It has been revealed that a large number of user’s data has been stolen to be sold from both social media sites, MySpace and Tumblr.

It is thought that the actual data breach occurred a number of years ago but due to the information only now being advertised for sale, the breach has only come to the attention of those concerned recently.

In relation to the MySpace hack, emails and passwords from 360.2 million accounts have been accessed even though they were meant to have been protected by a form of software. This software however was weak and was easily cracked.

MySpace have issued a statement on the situation stating that they have invalidated all affected accounts created before 11th June 2013 and are continuing to combat any suspicious activity both through automated tools and by aiding law enforcement.

While this breach may not seem as serious due to the lapse in time, it could have bearing on any other accounts with different organisations depending on the use of similar or identical passwords by users.

The Tumblr data is again from the same time frame, around 2013, and included a list of email addresses with partially obscured passwords attached. As the passwords are not listed in full, this breach will have a lesser effect but it is thought that 65 million accounts have been affected which is deemed one of the largest attacks of its kind.

This news comes in the same month as another large scale breach on professional connection site, LinkedIn. Here it was uncovered that a 4 yr. old database containing more than 167 million LinkedIn ID’s was being traded online.  

In an age where online security is constantly under strain and our lives are being more and more digital, it is becoming more apparent that no matter how clued up we are on how to stay protected online, our data may not always be safe.

If you'd like to know more about this article please send an email to Ellis Sweetenham quoting the article title and any questions you might have, alternatively call the office number on 02380 235 979 or send an enquiry through our contact form.

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