Home > Reading Room > Dozens of Chinese Companies Scramble to Register Ivanka Trump Trade Mark

Dozens of Chinese Companies Scramble to Register Ivanka Trump Trade Mark

Written by Fozia Cheychi on 22 February 2017

« Return to Reading Room

According to the South China Morning Post, various Chinese companies have submitted at least 65 applications to China’s Trademark Office of the State Administration for Industry and Commerce in order to trade mark Ivanka Trump’s name for products ranging from weight loss supplements to cosmetics and everything in between.

Ivanka Trump’s popularity has soared in China after she attended the Lunar New Year celebration held at Beijing’s embassy in Washington with Arabella- her five-year-old daughter. This has prompted a rush amongst Chinese companies to claim rights to trade mark ‘Ivanka’. This move comes at a time when US retailers such as Nordstrom are dropping Ivanka Trump’s line as a result of poor sales.

China’s trade mark laws permit businesses to register foreign names, or the Chinese translation/version of those names as trade mark’s. A practice which has led to a number of intellectual property disputes.

Last year the reading room reported the following case http://www.lawdit.co.uk/news/2818/109/Apple-Loses-Trade-Mark-Battle-in-China-Over-iPhone-name, in which a Chinese court ruled against US tech giant Apple in a dispute involving its iPhone trade mark. The small manufacturer of leather goods and handbags won the case.

The first daughter owns a fashion brand under her name and in 2012 her company Ivanka Trump Marks LLC secured a Chinese trade mark ‘Ivanka’ for shoes and clothing. The company has since gone on to file further trade mark applications for a range of products including jewellery and bags.

If the applications are successful, the companies concerned would be entitled to use the name Ivanka to promote and sell their products.

The American President has himself struggled for years to win back the rights to his name in China after a Chinese construction firm had successfully secured a 10-year trade mark for ‘Trump’. Last week after a successful meeting between the American president and the Chinese president, China finally gave Trump his much-coveted trade mark.

 

 

 

 

 

If you'd like to know more about this article please send an email to Michael Coyle quoting the article title and any questions you might have, alternatively call the office number on 02380 235 979 or send an enquiry through our contact form.

Want to speak
to someone?

Complete the form below and we’ll call you back free of charge.

Visual Captcha