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Headline: Blockchain is on the up and Sony are steering the ship.

Written by Mark Reed on 23 October 2018

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Rights management systems have been touched on as a possible way to incorporate blockchain technology. We at Lawdit have been banging on about this for so long, it almost started to drain away the enthusiasm when certain aspects of this technology were not being utilised in various industries.

Then all of a sudden, a ball was dropped on our heads to wake us up and it was dropped by Sony who are developing a rights management system for digital written works such as e-books. It was claimed by Sony that the use of blockchain technology would help make the ownership of copyright more efficient, especially as advances on digital content has meant that absolutely anyone can broadcast content.

Now consider everything that Lawdit has reported on, explanatory notes that we have made and put all that knowledge in to understanding the method in which Sony plan to use blockchain. They claim that the system they are developing will have the ability to show the time and date stamp on works from the electronic data’s inception, and then rely on blockchain to store this information which makes it difficult to hack and alter.

In a statement, Sony said that “Blockchains create networks where programs and information are difficult to destroy or falsify, and are well-adapted for the free transfer of data and rights. Using blockchain to record the rights-related information of written works will allow users to verify when data was created, and by whom, as well as allowing users to verify the rights-generation of written works.”

Although we are not entirely sure exactly how it will be utilised, it is clear that Sony will be using blockchain to manage the rights within film and music as well as e-books as stated previously. On top of this, they plan to extend the use of the technology in their education part of the giant organisation so that it can store and assist the handling of educational resources.

This sort of advancement has been a long time coming, and the use of blockchain technology outside the cryptocurrency sector is arguably a natural progression which we and other experts foresaw and are pleased to see it becoming a reality.
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