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Apple v Norwegian Political Party Logo Dispute

Written by Sena Tokel, Student from Southampton Solent University on 06 March 2019

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Norwegian Progress Party Fremskrittspartiet’s red apple logo has been contested by tech giant Apple Inc with claims that the two apples will cause confusion.

Last year saw the political party make application to the Norwegian Patent Office to trademark their red apple logo as a brand in several categories. Soon after, Norway-based intellectual property firm representing the IT giant Apple formally objected the political parties trademark registration.

The objection was based on Apple’s claims that the parties mark is likely to be confused with its own registered trademarks and resembles/incorporates elements of established branding thus, violating Norway’s Trade Mark laws.

Trine Greaker Herzog who represents tech giant Apple, wrote to the Norwegian Patent office stating: 

"The objection is based on the fact that the registered mark is likely to be confused with our client's previously registered rights," further adding that the Progress Party's logo can be confused with several other Apple logos, including Apple Music and Apple Pay.

The Fremskrittspartiet logo, which has been around for over 3 decades was registered for the use of a range of products including digital media, printed materials, clothing, games, toys and kitchen utensils.

Fredrik Farber, the parties secretary general explained that the party was currently introducing graphic updates to its apple logo in ten different categories.

"The categories that involve our trademark apple include political and education activities. But we will also protect our logo for election campaigns, clothing and various small items," he explained.

Norway's Patent and Trademark Office forwarded Apple's objection to Fremskrittspartiet, which has until March 28 to lodge a response.

 

 

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