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Who got out of the Blocks first to protect their Blockchain brand?

Written by Ellis Sweetenham on 21 November 2017

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With technology adapting and developing day by day, internet purchasing and the use of money online will soon change beyond recognition.

The change will be all down to Blockchain.

Blockchain in simple terms is virtually tamperproof online ledger with registers and validates payments without the need for validation from a central authority. A Blockchain can not only be used to exchange money but practically anything that requires security, such as data.

The use of Blockchain and Cryptocurrencies has grown at a rapid rate over the past few years which its growth not looking to slow down any time soon.

With the growth of a new technology, sees an influx of attempts to protect brands.

While some were quick of their Blocks to protect their brand, there are many that have not yet secure their trade mark.

The first trade mark applications to contain ‘Blockchain’ within the goods and services were made in the US in early 2014 by a European based company, Blockcorp Limited.  They made four applications, but only two are still valid, one being the word mark ‘Blocktrail’.

The first EU registration was made by Bolt Financial for the word ‘Bolt’ in January 2015.

In Janurary 2015, Colu Technologies secured the first success registration under the Madric Protocol for ‘COLU.

There are first applications in various countries continuing to pop up.

The importance of protecting a brand, especially in relation to a new technology is extremely high.

Lawdit Solicitors pride itself on being on of the leading law firms in the UK on Blockchain and Cryptocurrencies. We also have over 20 years’ experience in relation to Intellectual Property specifically trade marks.

Our Director Dr Michael Coyle will be happy to assist you in any way and aid you in protecting your Blockchain brand.

If you'd like to know more about this article please send an email to Ellis Sweetenham quoting the article title and any questions you might have, alternatively call the office number on 02380 235 979 or send an enquiry through our contact form.

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